Recipe: Watermelon Lemonade Smoothie

11 06 2010

(Yield:  1 serving)

This recipe can address both mistakes discussed this week (poor hydration and inadequate fruits and vegetables).  Watermelon is just over 90% water, so it can aid in hydrating your body.  It also provides a fair amount of vitamins.  It is a good source of vitamin A (beta carotene), vitamin B6, and vitamin C.

  • Vitamin A is important for optimal eye health and boosts immunity by increasing the actions of white blood cells.
  • Vitamin B6 found in watermelon is used by the body to manufacture brain chemicals, such as serotonin, melatonin and dopamine, which may help the body cope with stress.
  • Vitamin C in watermelon can help to enhance the immune system and can protect a body from harmful free radicals.

Ingredients

1 cup Seedless Watermelon chunks

½ cup Plain Greek Yogurt (I like Oikos)

¼ Cup Lemon Juice

1 – 2 TBSP Sugar

Directions:

  1. Combine all ingredients in blender.
  2. Blend on high speed until smooth.

Nutritional information per Serving:

Calories   270 Carbohydrates   38g Fiber  1g Protein   24g Fat 0g Sat. Fat   0g

Oatmeal can be added to smoothies for a nutritional boost.  Add ¼ cup of quick cook oats to blender first.  Blend on high until it’s a fine powder.  Then add the rest of the ingredients and blend.  This will be a little thicker.  So, if you want a thinner drink, add water or more lemon juice.

Nutritional information per Serving (with ¼ cup of Oats):

Calories   320 Carbohydrates   51g Fiber  3g Protein   27g Fat 1g Sat. Fat   0g

© Randy Bird, MS, RD, CSSD, CSCS and Randy Bird Sports Nutrition, 2010.





Common Mistake #4: Inadequate consumption of fruits and vegetables

7 06 2010

Fruits and vegetables provide the vitamins, minerals, and phytonutrients that help your body function optimally, fight inflammation, and ward off illness.  Athletes are under tremendous stress.  You not only endure physical stress from training and environmental conditions, but also emotional stress.  Worrying about your position on the depth chart, upcoming competitions, academics, or your job can significantly contribute to your stress level. In addition, you may have stress in your personal lives. Stress can be overwhelming, and can build up over time during the long grind of the season.

If your diet is lacking fruits and vegetables, you will be more vulnerable to stress.  This vulnerability to stress weakens your immune system, lowering your work capacity and could knock you out of training. You cannot afford to have unnecessary downtime because of a weak immune system.  By focusing on getting adequate fruits and vegetables, you can minimize down time. Being taken down for a day or two is much better than missing a week or more.

By eating a fruit or vegetable at every meal or snack, you are helping to protect your body from the effects of stress.  It is essential to get a colorful variety of fruits, vegetables, and nuts into your diet daily.  The more “colors” you eat, the more essential vitamins and minerals you are providing your body.

Red Yellow/Orange White Green Blue/Purple Brown
Cherries

Craisins

Cranberries

Raspberries

Red Bell Peppers

Red Cabbage

Strawberries

Tomatoes

Watermelon

Butternut Squash

Canola Oil

Cantaloupe

Carrots

Grapefruit

Oranges

Peaches

Pineapples

Pumpkin

Sweet Potatoes

Tangerines

Yellow Bell Peppers

Apples

Bananas

Cauliflower

Onions

Pears

White Peaches

White Potatoes

Asparagus

Avocado

Broccoli

Brussels Sprouts

Collards

Green Bell Peppers

Green Olives

Guacamole

Kale

Mustard Greens

Romaine Lettuce

Spinach

Black Olives

Blackberries

Blueberries

Plums

Prunes

Purple Grapes

Raisins

Almonds

Brazil Nuts

Cashews

Olive Oil

Peanuts

Pecans

Pumpkin Seeds

Sunflower Seeds

Walnuts

Wheat Germ

Bottom Line: Eat a fruit or vegetable at every meal or snack.  Strive to eat from every color throughout the week.

© Randy Bird, MS, RD, CSSD, CSCS and Randy Bird Sports Nutrition, 2010.